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Ethical Fashion Guatemala
fairness

Guatemalan artisans go after Etsy for copyright infringement

How can artisans in garment producing countries protect makers' rights?

Artisans in garment producing countries usually have limited Internet access, no website development skills or even means to ship products. This makes them easy targets for copyright infringement. In Guatemala, hopes to fill this gap by providing the artisans with a platform of their own where they can shape their narrative, gain access to a global market and receive a fair cut of the final sale price of their products.

guatemalan artisans are going after etsy

Imagine you're a weaver or leather worker in Guatemala...

Imagine you're a weaver or leather worker in Guatemala. You work intensely on a product - let's say a bag featuring textiles unique to your heritage - and sell it to an American tourist for $ 35. It's worth a good deal more, you think, but Americans are making a hard bargain and considering that 65% of your nation lives below the poverty line, it's always better than nothing. You make the sale.

A few months later, you stumble across the bag you made selling online for almost $ 300 on an American website that claims to be beneficial to artisans like yourself. The website may feature a picture of yourself that you have never given the visiting tourist permission to take or use, or it may feature a picture of a weaver you have never met from another village.

Read the full article on fashionista.com.

fairness

Guatemalan artisans go after Etsy for copyright infringement

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